Your Solution for SMART Response Plans

10 Commonly Used National Incident Command System Forms

Posted on Mon, Oct 31, 2011

Throughout an emergency, response communication among emergency response teams at the scene and incident response teams off-site is critical.  Chronology of events, incident action plans, and situation status information needs to be maintained.  Incident command forms are utilized to document these primary response components and provide the site-specific information.

Implementing an Incident Command System (ICS) process provides tools and process to enable response teams to swiftly define appropriate resolutions for the current situation. The  Incident Command System provides industry standard forms that may be necessary in an emergency response situation.

Completing the Standard Incident Command System forms should be a part of any incident management process.  The following are commonly used forms and their description or purpose. 

1. ICS 001, Standard Incident Report Form:

  • Summary of incident or situation, summary of response actions, number of injured, etc.  Format is consistent with National Response Center (NRC) report requirements for oil and chemical spills. 

2. ICS 201, Incident Briefing

  • 2-page form for recording basic incident information. Summary of incident or situation, summary of response actions, number of injured, etc.

3. ICS 201a, On-Scene Incident Briefing

  • This is an abbreviated 2-page version of the standard ICS 201 Form, and is designed for use by the on-scene Incident Commander to summarize incident status for communication to Incident Management Team (IMT), or to facilitate change-over to a new incoming on-scene Incident Commander (IC).
  • Provides basic information regarding the on-scene situation and the resources allocated to the incident.
  • Serves as a permanent record of the on-scene response to the incident.

4. ICS 203, Organizatiion Assignment list

  • Provides the IMT with information on the units that are currently activated and the names of personnel staffing each position/unit.
  • Provides information used to complete Form 207 Organizational Chart.

5. ICS 204, Assignment List

  • Used to inform Operations Section personnel of incident assignments.
  • Once the assignments are agreed to by the IMT Director and Command Staff, the assignment list is given to the appropriate Units and Divisions via the Communications Center

6. ICS 209, Incident Status Summary

  • Used for posting information on Emergency Command Center (ECC) displays.
  • Provides Command Staff with basic information for use in planning for the next operational period.
  • Provides basic information to the Public Information Officer for preparation of media releases.
  • Provides incident information to agency dispatch and off-incident coordination centers.

7. ICS 211E-OS, Check-in list (equipment)

  • Used to track personnel and equipment arriving at the incident at various locations. The Check-in List serves several purposes:
  • Records arrival times at the incident of all overhead personnel and equipment.
  • Records the initial location of personnel and equipment so a subsequent assignment can be made, if needed.
  • Helps with demobilization by recording the home base, method of travel, etc., on all check-ins.

8. ICS 211P-OS, Check-in List (personnel)

  • Used to track personnel and equipment arriving at the incident at various locations. The Check-in List serves several purposes:
  • Records arrival times at the incident of all overhead personnel and equipment.
  • Records the initial location of personnel and equipment so a subsequent assignment can be made, if needed.
  • Helps with demobilization by recording the home base, method of travel, etc., on all check-ins.

9.ICS 214, Unit Log

  • Used to record details of activity within a unit including strike team activity.
  • Provide information that may be included in any after-action report.

10. ICS 214A-OS, Individual Log

  • Used to record details of each individual team member’s activities.
  • Provide information that may be included in any after-action report.

A breakdown of information flow during the chaos of an emergency typically results in poorly defined incident objectives and priorities, duplication of response actions, and missing important response considerations. As a result, overall company reputation may be compromised, and response costs, fines, and lawsuits may increase substantially.  Communication based on real-time information is necessary to update external stakeholders, including agencies, the media, and impacted/cpncerned citizens, especially those in the area of the incident. If an emergency incident is mismanaged, the overall viability of a company can be at risk.

For tips and best practices on designing a crisis management program, download Best Practices for Crisis Management.

TRP Corp - Emergency Response Planning Crisis Management

 

Tags: Business Continuity, Emergency Preparedness, Crisis Management, Regulatory Compliance, Facility Management, Emergency Management Program, Disaster Recovery, Disaster Response, National Preparedness