Your Solution for SMART Response Plans

How to Quickly Develop Response Plans after a Merger or Acquisition

Posted on Thu, May 01, 2014

Companies are not stagnant, as evidenced from the many acquisitions, mergers, and organic growth seen every year. The dynamic nature of the energy sector (and others) requires corporate emergency management and business continuity programs to periodically adjust their approach.

Whether a facility is located in the U.S. or abroad, ensuring compliance, employee safety, and an effective response requires a streamlined, coordinated, and exercised response plan. All response plans within the corporate enterprise should address site-specific facility details, appropriate response processes, standardized company-wide best practices, and maintain location-specific regulatory compliance. A customized response plan template enables development of  a streamlined, site-specific preparedness program that consistently delivers company-standard guidelines and practices while providing a medium for rapid assimilation of acquired facilities.

Generic response plan templates that do not account for site-specific details may result in  incomplete, ineffective, and non-regulatory compliant plans.  Companies with multiple-facility operations should utilize a customizable template with the ability to inject distinct facility information and hazards for each operation, pre-approved company best practices, as well as applicable local, state, and federal requirements. Industrial operations are required by law to institute site-specific emergency response plans, and train employees according to their response roles and method of response pertinent to operations.

Integrating response plans under one centralized format consolidates preparedness and response objectives. In company merger circumstances, this process requires clear, concise, and frequent communication.  A single individual or coordinated team should manage the consolidation of emergency management practices. It is critical to define preparedness objectives, response roles, and responsibilities in order to eliminate ambiguity and confusion.  Responsible parties must apply data, site assessments, and validated information into cohesive, compliant, and effective response plans for the new enterprise.

Acquired facilities must be absorbed into the company-wide emergency management program. If response plans exist, companies should perform a gap analysis or audit to identify any procedural, company policy, or compliance deficiencies.

New or outlying facilities may present preparedness and response challenges. Cultural differences, infrastructure challenges, response equipment availability, minimal response knowledge and training, and security priorities may require heighten preparedness priorities and planning efforts. As a result, new locations within multi-facility companies may be particularly vulnerable to crisis or emergency response situations.

The following fundamental preparedness and response questions may assist companies in absorbing facilities into an established emergency management program. Determining site-specific information, possible mitigation efforts, and response capabilities can mobilize stakeholders to develop necessary and required response planning objectives. (Note: The questions below are meant to initialize conversations and should not be considered a thorough checklist for preparedness and response planning)

Who will be in charge of the  response?

  • Identify Incident Commander
  • Create Emergency Management Team organizational chart
  • Identify Emergency Management Team activation measures
  • Create Emergency Management Team roles and responsibilities checklists

Does the facility have a current response plan?

  • Update necessary contact information and notifications
  • Perform a gap analysis of the current plan(s) against new operations, equipment, company policies, industry best practices and applicable regulations
  • Review agency approval and submittal processes and comply as necessary

What threats affect the facility or employees?

  • Perform a detailed hazard and risk analysis
  • Verify or create response procedures for each identified threat
  • Identify the new process for incident documentation
  • Utilize appropriate ICS Forms
  • Identify current and necessary equipment necessary for response

What regulatory requirements  apply to this facility?

  • Evaluate operations for compliance
  • Identify required training and confirm documentation
  • Review submitted response plan information
  • Perform a compliance audit

If necessary, what organization will conduct additional response duties?

  • Identify response capabilities and determine if additional resources are necessary
  • Initiate a Memorandum Of Understanding or contract specific response needs
  • Confirm contact information, availability, and response times

How will the emergency be reported and response initiated?

  • Create site-specific notification procedures. (Emergency notifications may include 911, National response Center, internal or external response team, emergency services, and others)
  • Identify alarm signals that signal employee evacuation or shelter in place.
  • Test alarms to confirm they are in proper working condition
  • Ensure employees are trained in alarm procedures and immediate response actions per roles and responsibilities
  • Implement company approved emergency classification levels to associated response procedures with emergency conditions to prevent the incident from escalating

What incidents or classification level require evacuation/shelter in place

  • Create multiple evacuation routes.
  • Does the evacuation go beyond facility borders?
  • Identify the muster point(s) and head count procedures?

How are response actions sustained?

  • Establish  command post location
  • Identify internal and external response resources and equipment for a sustained response
  • Share response plan with appropriate responders/stakeholders
  • Develop a communications plan  and identify sustainable communications equipment
  • Identify hazard control applicability and methods
  • Detail external communications and public relations policies

What is done after the incident is secured?

  • Create checklist to demobilize the response
  • Identify post incident review and debriefing objectives
  • Generate a means to apply “lessons learned”
  • Update response plan accordingly and amend necessary training

 

Challenged with managing preparedness amongst your various facilites? Download TRP's best practices guide on response planning for large organizations with multi-facility operations.

Multiple Facility Response Planning Company Preparedness Guide DOWNLOAD

Tags: Response Plans, Redundant Systems, Regulatory Compliance, Facility Management, Emergency Management Program