Your Solution for SMART Response Plans

Streamlining Response Planning in the Midst of Slashed Oil & Gas Budgets

Posted on Thu, Mar 10, 2016

In the face of decreasing profits, many oil and gas HSE departments will encounter challenging operational environments and cost cutting initiatives.  However, these departments can minimize or eliminate noncompliance fines and reduce the costs of a disaster. Effective and exercised preparedness and response planning satisfies regulatory compliance requirements, decreases response costs, and fulfills a moral responsibility to protect employees, the community, and the environment.

As oil and gas companies’ budgets shrink and business protocols continue to require preparedness and response planning financial justification, the need to demonstrate the economic benefit of risk reduction costs to decision makers is increasing. However, while historical occurrences can present a general understanding of potential costs of disasters, unique circumstances continually change the landscape of the cost-benefit analysis of preparedness and response planning. Forward thinking risk analyses and associated costs justifications are often minimized and sidelined by profitable operational priorities. The uncertainty of circumstances surrounding an emergency or disaster including human error, equipment failure, climatology, population growth, and/or other external influences, coupled with a “it won’t happen to us” mentality lead to a notion of unjustifiable cost/benefit implementation.

However, the costs associated with regulatory noncompliance fines are often the catalyst for companies to prioritize preparedness and response planning. Fortunately, technological advancements have provided a simplified framework for addressing the administrative costs associated with maintaining compliant response plans. Confirming and updating regulatory compliance is simplified with an enterprise-wide, universally accessible response planning system. As a result, administration costs associated with mandated preparedness and response planning upkeep are reduced, justifying the cost of this new technology.

Implementing advanced software that enables companies to maintain the same or higher levels of compliance with less staff (such as TRP's SMARTPLANis critical when budgets are reduced. Corporate emergency management and HSE budgets can be stretched if response planning software:

  • Facilitates a reduction of dedicated staff
  • Facilitates the ability to update corporate planning elements across locations, sites, geographies, without compromising site-specific details and response challenges
  • Incorporates a simplified foundation to address plan related employee changes and facility acquisitions
  • Allows for streamlined regulatory compliance audits and reduces non-compliance issues on a company-wide scale
  • Automates regulatory governance with electronic submissions

In addition, an effectively exercised and accessible emergency response plan minimizes the duration of the incident and in turn minimizes associated costs and the impacts of an emergency on employees, the environment, and infrastructure.

In order for the oil and gas industry to continue to be one of the safest operating industrial sectors in the United States, the industry must continue to audit, test, and update preparedness endeavors and response capabilities. Supplying emergency management programs with advanced response planning technology will enable companies to meet key strategic and tactical preparedness objectives within the confines of a reduced budget. These key objectives include, but are not limited to:

  • Facilitating compliance with Federal, State, and Local regulatory requirements, eliminating the threat of potential fines.
  • Reducing property damage through expedited responses
  • Enhancing the ability to recover from business interruption and loss (ex. damaged industrial, commercial, and retail facilities)
  • Reducing indirect business interruption loss (ex. supply chain “ripple” effects)
  • Reducing environmental damage (ex. wetlands, parks, wildlife)
  • Enhancing a company’s image and credibility with employees, customers, suppliers and the community.
  • Reducing other non-market damage (ex. historic sites, schools, neighborhoods)
  • Minimizing societal losses (ex. casualties, injuries)
  • Reducing need for emergency response (ex. ambulance service, fire protection).
  • Reducing exposure to civil or criminal liability in the event of an incident.
  • Potentially reducing insurance premiums (check with individual insurance providers for associated savings).

Regulatory compliance and response planning initiatives are often sacrificed in cost control activities. However, noncompliance fines or one ineffectively response to an emergency, disaster, or crisis situation can cost a company many times the cost of implementing and maintaining an effective program.

Multiple Facility Response Planning Company Preparedness Guide DOWNLOAD

Tags: Regulatory Compliance, HSE Program

The Importance of Response Plan Training for the First Responder

Posted on Thu, Jan 22, 2015

Any employee has the potential to be put in a first responder role in the event of an emergency at the office, jobsite, or facility.  As a result, all employees should be trained in response measures appropriate for site-specific vulnerabilities and identified risks. The rapid mobilization and proficiency of initial actions, as well as response procedure familiarity is essential in order to minimize potential chaos, scenario consequences, and plausible chain-reaction events.

In order to avoid the onset of panic or prolong emergency circumstances, necessary and effective reactive measures should become second nature to any potential initial responder. Familiarity through training and exercises can combat the natural effects of stress in tense situations. Having a well-rehearsed emergency plan enables efficient and effective response coordination, reduces losses, and can limit the impact to employees, the environment, and surrounding community.

Efforts must be made to train non-response team members in initial response actions and the appropriate initiation procedures. Any employee or contractor, upon discovering a significant event or condition that requires urgent response from outside trained personnel, should be trained to take the suggested initial response actions listed below:

Initial Response Actions:

  1. Warn others in the immediate area through verbal communication and/or activate local alarms.

  2. Take immediate personal protective measures (PPE, move to safe location, etc.).

  3. Report the emergency to Security or 9-1-1, depending on company policy.

  4. Implement local response actions (process shutdowns, activate fire protection systems, etc.) if safe to do so, and consistent with level of training and area specific procedures.

Industrial facility employees often encounter unique, site-specific hazards, and potential threats, unlike those in other fields. Specialized training must complement response team roles and responsibilities in order to address these specific vulnerabilities and risks. But despite an industrial setting, not all employees will be assigned to a formal response team.

Employees who may be exposed to hazardous substances are required to be HAZWOPER certified. HAZWOPER, an acronym for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard, communicates the required training that addresses hazardous operations and potential spills or releases. The intent of the HAZWOPER standard is to protect workers engaged in "Emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances without regard to the location of the hazard." (29 CFR 1910.120(a)(1)(v)).  However, this does not mean that all HAZWOPER certified employees are responsible for terminating a release. According to the standard, the following first responder levels are not trained to terminate a hazardous incident.

The Awareness Level:  According to OSHA, the first responders at the “awareness level” must demonstrate competency in areas such as recognizing the presence of hazardous materials in an emergency, the risks involved, and the role they play in their employer’s plan.

Who should be trained? This level is applicable for persons who, in the course of their normal duties, could be the first on the scene of an emergency involving hazardous material. Responders at the awareness level are expected to recognize the presence of hazardous materials, protect themselves, call for trained personnel, and secure the area without engagement.

Individual companies can set their own hourly training requirements; however, employees must be capable of demonstrating the following:

  • What hazardous substances are, and associated risks during an incident

  • The potential outcomes associated with an emergency when hazardous substances are present

  • Ability to recognize the presence of hazardous substances in an emergency

  • Ability to identify the hazardous substances, if possible

  • The role of the first responder awareness individual in the employer's emergency response plan, including site security and control and the U.S. Department of Transportation's Emergency Response Guidebook

  • Ability to realize the need to make appropriate notifications for additional resources

The Operations Level: Operations level responders meet and exceed the competency level of the awareness responder. Operational responders are trained to respond in a defensive fashion without actually trying to terminate the release. Their function is to contain the release from a safe distance, keep it from spreading, and prevent exposures.

Who should be trained? These responders are part of the initial response for the purpose of protecting nearby persons, the environment, and/or property from the effects of the release.   Operations may receive additional training in HAZMAT/CBRNE defensive techniques of absorption, damming and diking, diverting, retention, vapor dispersion and suppression. They may also be trained in basic decontamination procedures and PPE.

First responders at the operational level should complete the 8-hour HAZWOPER training course or have had sufficient experience to objectively demonstrate competency in the following areas:

  • Basic hazard and risk assessment techniques

  • How to select and use proper personal protective equipment

  • Basic hazardous materials terms

  • How to perform basic control, containment and/or confinement operations within the capabilities of the resources and personal protective equipment available with their unit

  • How to implement basic decontamination procedures

  • The relevant standard operating procedures and termination procedures

For a free download on conducting an effective exercise, click here or the image below.

TRP Corp Emergency Response Planning Exercises

Tags: OSHA HAZWOPER, Facility Response Plan, Response Plans, Facility Management, Disaster Response, Workplace Safety, Chemical Industry, HSE Program

Incident Response Drills and Tabletop Exercises

Posted on Thu, Jul 17, 2014

There are various types of types of emergency response drills and exercises that target specific goals. They can range from small group discussions to complex, multi-faceted exercises. But each drill or exercise presents the opportunity to improve site-specific response plans, rendering the potential for a more effective response.

Response plan testing can begin with simple exercises intended to validate general response plan comprehension or incorporate an all-inclusive, full-scale, realistic, multi-scenario exercise. Managers should determine the goals of the exercise before settling on a particular method. To fully execute a response plan, synergistic drills or exercises should be developed to assess the following critical response skills:

  • Communication
  • Training
  • Resource management
  • Teamwork

An exercise should prepared employees and responders to minimize the impacts of an incident. Below are three of the most basic exercises.

1. Orientations: The purpose of an orientation is to familiarize participants with roles, responsibilities, plans, procedures, and equipment. Orientations can resolve questions of coordination and assignment of responsibilities. The inclusion of first responders and facility staff promotes the development of an effective plan.

2. Drills: The goal of a drill is to practice aspects of the response plan and prepare teams and participants for more extensive exercises in the future. A drill can test a specific operation or function of the response plan.  Facilities should conduct evacuations, shelter in place, and lockdown drills to demonstrate emergency response actions. Drills can be altered to incorporate various scenario situations. The procedures, individual responsibilities, and public safety coordination may be addressed depending on the presented scenario or outcome of the drill.

3. Tabletop Exercises: A tabletop exercise simulates an emergency situation in an informal, stress-free environment.  The participants, usually comprised of decision-making level staff and responders, gather to discuss simulated procedures and general problems/solutions in the context of an emergency scenario.  The focus is on training and familiarization with roles, procedures, and responsibilities relative to the emergency synopsis and potential injects.

Below is a list of common tabletop exercise planning considerations:

Condensed Exercise Time Frame: In order to exercise the emergency scenario, the exercise must progress in a condensed timeframe (not real-time). Events should move rapidly through the phases of the exercised response. However, it should be clearly understood that under real conditions the same events or actions might require additional time to complete. Conversely, real world scenarios can quickly change and transition from a basic emergency to a full scale crisis within a short time frame that require rapid decision making and expeditious responses.

Scenario Information and Position-Specific Tools: Detailed scenario information, ICS forms, and position specific events should be prepared to guide all participants through the execution of their roles and responsibilities. These tools should be included in a participation package and distributed to all participants prior to the exercise. A web-based drill and exercise management tool can streamline the distribution of these tools.

Weather Conditions: Depending on the scenario and if the weather is a critical factor, either real or simulated weather conditions may be utilized during the exercise.

“This is a Drill” Exercise Communications: All radio, telephone, fax and written communications must begin and end with the statement "This is a Drill".  Include this statement in all verbal communications, and in a prominent location on all written correspondence, including report forms, fax communications, and press releases. It may be helpful to add the date to any written documentation for organizational and regulatory compliance purposes.

Communications with external agencies, contractors, medical responders, or other parties not participating directly in an exercise must begin and end with the statement, "This is a Drill". This may involve state or federal regulatory notifications or contact with suppliers or vendors to source simulated logistical needs. In all cases, exercise participants must ensure that the all involved parties clearly understand that no actual emergency exists, and no resources or equipment should be mobilized or dispatched.

Response Equipment Deployment: Emergency equipment and vehicles should be simulated for tabletop exercises. Staging area locations should be identified.

Injects: Injects may be provided to some participants or as a component of the exercise. An inject describes an additional event or circumstance that requires a response or action from the participant.

Exercise Termination and Debriefing: Following termination of the exercise, a debriefing of all exercise participants should be conducted.  All participants should have the opportunity to provide feedback on the exercise and complete an exercise evaluation form. Feedback should be evaluated for potential response plan mitigation opportunities.

Follow-up on Action Items: Exercises may provide insight into the deficiencies in an emergency response plan. In order to take response efforts to the next level, action items resulting from the exercises should be completed in a timely manner.

For a free download entitled, "Tips on How to Conduct an Effective Exercise", click the image below:

TRP Corp Emergency Response Planning Exercises

Tags: Tabletop Exercise, Training and Exercises, Facility Management, Emergency Management Program, Communication Plan, Workplace Safety, HSE Program

Tips for Facility Security Planning and Training

Posted on Thu, Jul 10, 2014

Managing the Facility Security Plan (FSP) related administrative duties and associated training requirements can be time-consuming and complex, particularly for large companies. With multiple, dynamic, and security-related response planning variables, many large companies implement a response planning system with a training and exercises management component. Advanced web-based systems can ease the burdens of training documentation, scheduling, and maintenance while verifying regulatory compliance. Managing an enterprise-wide security training program can be complicated by:

  • Multiple fluctuating certification/expiration dates
  • Diverse and varying scope of responder/employee responsibilities
  • Site-specific operations and response objectives
  • Maintaining company standards and best practice priorities
  • Regulatory compliance measures
  • Multiple facilities across several locations
  • Employee turnover

A FSP and those facilities required to comply with U.S. Coast Guard’s (USCG) 40 CFR 105 regulation should include site-specific details on the following components:

Notification: The Facility Security Officer must have a means to effectively notify facility personnel of changes in security conditions at a facility. Transportation security incidents are reported to the National Response Center and to appropriate emergency responders. At each active facility access point, a system must be in place to allow communication with authorities with security responsibilities, including the police, security control, and the emergency operations center.

Fencing and monitoring: The FSP must describe security measures to prevent unauthorized access to cargo storage areas, including continuous monitoring through a combination of lighting, security guards, and other methods.

Evacuation: The owner or operator must identify the location of escape and evacuation routes and assembly stations to ensure that personnel are able to evacuate during security threats.

Assessment: The Facility Security Assessment requires description of the layout of the facility, and response procedures for emergency conditions, threat assessment, and vulnerabilities, with a focus on areas at the facility that may be vulnerable to a security threat, such as utility equipment and services vital to operations.

Training: A security plan should describe the training, drills, and security actions of persons at the facility. These actions should deter, to the maximum extent practicable, a transportation security incident, or a substantial security threat. If a facility is required to comply with §105.210, facility personnel with security duties must be trained in the following: (Note: These guidelines are also beneficial to facilities not required to comply with the USCG’s 40 CFR part 105 requirement)

  • Knowledge of current security threats and patterns
  • Recognition and detection of dangerous substances and devices
  • Recognition of characteristics and behavioral patterns of persons who are likely to threaten security
  • Techniques used to circumvent security measures
  • Crowd management and control techniques
  • Security related communications
  • Knowledge of emergency procedures and contingency plans
  • Operation of security equipment and systems
  • Testing, calibration, and maintenance of security equipment and systems
  • Inspection, control, and monitoring techniques
  • Relevant provisions of the FSP

Proper documentation is a critical aspect of any emergency management program. If a facility is required to comply with the USCG’s 40 CFR part 105 regulations, certain documentation is required to be available at the facility and made available to the USCG upon request. A web-based planning system can ensure plan documentation is available from various locations and can expedite plan distribution. The USCG’s 40 CFR 105 requires the following documentation:  

  1. The approved FSP, as well as any approved revisions or amendments thereto, and a letter of approval from the COTP dated within the last 5 years.
  2. The FSP submitted for approval and an acknowledgement letter from the COTP stating that the USCG is currently reviewing the FSP submitted for approval, and that the facility may continue to operate so long as the facility remains in compliance with the submitted FSP.
  3. For facilities operating under a USCG-approved Alternative Security Program as provided in §105.140, a copy of the Alternative Security Program the facility is using, including a facility specific security assessment report generated under the Alternative Security Program, as specified in §101.120(b)(3), and a letter signed by the facility owner or operator, stating which Alternative Security Program the facility is using and certifying that the facility is in full compliance with that program.

For a free download entitled, "Tips on How to Conduct an Effective Exercise", click the image below:

TRP Corp Emergency Response Planning Exercises

Tags: Resiliency, Training and Exercises, Security plans, Department of Homeland Security, Communication Plan, HSE Program

How to Manage Preparedness Training for Multiple Downstream Facilties

Posted on Thu, Jul 03, 2014

Luck runs out, but safety is good for life.  ~Author Unknown

Whether an industrial facility is domestically located or abroad, ensuring compliance, employee safety, and an effective response requires a comprehensive training and exercise program. All training and exercise components within a corporate enterprise should address site-specific operations, appropriate response processes, standardized company-wide best practices, and maintain location-specific regulatory compliance.

The challenge of managing and ensuring compliant training programs for multiple facilities and various regulatory agencies is complex. Certification efforts, enforcement mandates, and costly non-compliance fines may result from the lack of implemented, thorough, or effective programs. By utilizing available technology to manage an enterprise-wide training approach, companies can verify compliance and response readiness through a cohesive, yet site-specific standardization of best practices.

Through proper maintenance of a training portal, individuals will remain at peak optimal response capabilities. Training should include, but not be limited to:

  • Response plan familiarization
  • Individual roles and responsibilities
  • Plan review training whenever a substantial change or revision is made to the plan that affects organization, procedures, roles and responsibilities, or response capability.
  • Refresher courses, as necessary

Mid to large size companies should implement a preparedness and response training management system with the ability to identify and sort specialized data. When a company has multiple facilities, a centralized web-based database of scheduled, lapsed, and completed training enable facility managers to focus their efforts on operations and profitability. With a comprehensive, web-based, database-driven training management system, emergency managers and health, safety, and environmental departments can:

  1. Simplify training reviews
  2. Easily identify training inception and expiration dates
  3. Verify responder knowledge and ensure employee accountability
  4. Identify regulatory compliance training gaps
  5. Account for preparedness endeavors and associated costs
  6. Ease maintenance and administrative efforts

For companies looking to systematically manage the training and development of their staff, an enterprise-wide training management system is critical. Managing several disparate systems and multiple paper files is cumbersome and time consuming. Maintaining training information in a single, consolidated system provides significant benefits. A web-based training management system provides authorized users with secured access from a variety of locations. As facilities are added or modified, operations are revised, or employees are re-assigned, training records can be conveniently added, accessed, transferred, or updated for accuracy and compliance. A comprehensive, web-based training management system will:

  • Reduce the need for multiple site training management and documentation
  • Minimize administrative costs
  • Minimize training discrepancies across an enterprise
  • Provide a historical record of training certifications
  • Streamline training directives from one source
  • Serve as a legal instrument, if necessary
  • Engage management in prioritizing preparedness efforts
  • Enhance reporting functionality
  • Identify regulatory compliance training gaps

Training administration can be time-consuming and difficult, particularly in medium to large companies with staff employed in different roles across a variety of physical locations. A customized training management system can streamline this administrative effort, making it easy to ensure staff members receive the appropriate training, and instructors are supported with the necessary resources. A comprehensive system can

  • Track and report training completion or status by discipline, skill, position, individual, location, or over a specific time period
  • Generate summary reports that provide a snapshot of various mandated training versus completed and scheduled events
  • Print automated certifications and wallet cards

Advanced web-based technologies can also facilitate online training and provide classroom resources. While it is not essential to implementing web-based training, it can reduce costs associated with classroom instruction.  Some web-based training solutions include tools to share critical training information and lesson plans with students, reducing the time required to duplicate and distribute training materials across an enterprise.

While optimizing training is critical for regulatory compliance and safety, cost is always a deciding factor. Implementing a customized training management system in highly regulated environments is a proactive, cost-savings measure that can reduce the overall costs associated with incidents, training maintenance, and non-compliance.

For a free download entitled, "Tips on How to Conduct an Effective Exercise", click the image below:

TRP Corp Emergency Response Planning Exercises

Tags: OSHA, Training and Exercises, Workplace Safety, HAZWOPER, HSE Program

Documenting Oil and Gas Emergency Response Drills and Exercises

Posted on Thu, Jun 26, 2014

Amidst the business of sustaining profitable operations, oil and gas companies must ensure that work conditions are safe. Oil and gas operations have innate risks, hazards, and, in the event of a release or spill, potential detrimental impacts. As a result, regulatory agencies require response drills and exercises that adequately reflect the current operations and emergency response capabilities.

The National Preparedness for Response Exercise Program (PREP) is designed to facilitate the periodic testing of oil spill response plans for certain vessels and facilities, and provide companies an economically feasible mechanism for exercise compliance. This unified federal effort provides a consistent set of guidelines that satisfies the exercise requirements of the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Pipeline Hazardous Material Safety Administration (PHMSA), and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSSE). Completion and documentation of the PREP exercises satisfies all OPA 90 mandated federal oil pollution response exercise requirements.

Drill frequency and specific requirements vary depending on operations, vulnerabilities, facility location, and site hazards. However, documentation of oil and gas emergency preparedness drills and exercises is mandated by various regulatory agencies. Thorough documentation also:

  • Identifies deficiencies and mitigation opportunities
  • Provides a historical record of the event
  • Engages management in preparedness efforts
  • Serves as a legal instrument, if necessary
  • Ensures training accountability
  • Accounts for preparedness efforts and plan maintenance cost

In order to satisfy the PREP requirement, oil and gas companies must be able to document all operational and support aspects of a response, and provide detailed records of decisions and actions taken. An exercise tracking system that is integrated into an overall response planning system can minimize the documentation efforts associated with drills and exercises. A tracking system should:

  • Improve regulatory compliance with thorough documentation·
  • Provide a tool for scheduling exercises, and documenting PREP objectives, exercise objectives, lessons learned, scenarios, and action items.
  • Provide a tool for developing exercise final reports and a method of assigning and tracking outstanding action items to improve follow-up.
  • Provide a reporting mechanism to track PREP objectives completed during any 3 year cycle, outstanding action items, and a summary report by facility that indicates progress in meeting PREP exercise requirements.
  • Provide a “snapshot” of exercises completed for the year for every facility via a summary report.

To ensure employees and identified essential response personnel are prepared to respond to an incident in an efficient and effective manner, oil and gas companies should establish minimum exercise guideline requirements. Management should ensure that:

  • All aspects of response plans are exercised at least once per year with the appropriate response, incident management, and support teams taking part.
  • Notification exercises for Qualified Individuals are conducted on a quarterly basis. This exercise should involve unannounced checks of the communication processes, and systems.
  • National and local training and exercise requirements should be used to assess the overall integrated preparedness of a response with the authorities.

If not physically present during a drill and/or exercise, the final documentation from the events can be submitted to local responders or fire marshals for review. If a web-based planning system is utilized, drill and exercise documentation can be securely shared and accessed by approved stakeholders. In the event of an actual incident, the lessons learned from these drills and exercises can minimize impacts and prevent further consequences.

For a free download entitled, "Tips on How to Conduct an Effective Exercise", click the image below:

TRP Corp Emergency Response Planning Exercises

Tags: Testing, Tabletop Exercise, Training and Exercises, Emergency Management Program, HSE Program

Tips for Managing Corporate Emergency Management Training Programs

Posted on Thu, Jun 12, 2014

The ability to schedule, communicate, develop, document, and deliver training is a critical aspect of your environmental, health, safety and emergency response program. Training familiarizes employees and responders with safety and emergency procedures, equipment, and systems, and can identify deficiencies and mitigation opportunities in emergency response planning programs.

Managing the administrative duties associated with training requirements can be time consuming and complex, particularly for large companies. With the multiple variables associated with training, many large companies implement a training and exercise management system. An emergency response planning system with a training component can ease the burdens of documentation, scheduling, and maintenance. Managing an enterprise-wide training program can be complicated by:

  • Multiple fluctuating certification/expiration dates
  • Diverse and varying scope of responder/employee responsibilities
  • Site-specific operations and response objectives
  • Maintaining company standards and best practice priorities
  • Regulatory compliance measures
  • Multiple facilities across several locations
  • Employee turnover

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Accurate and verifiable training documentation enables response plans and procedures to be implemented as intended. Training topics and specialized training includes, but is not limited to:

  • Hazard and risk assessment techniques
  • Selection criteria of proper personal protective equipment
  • Incident reporting
  • Instruction and procedures for using personal protective and emergency equipment
  • Evacuation and alarm procedures
  • Specific roles and responsibilities in according to response scenarios (i.e. fire, explosion, severe weather)
  • An understanding of the role of the first responder in an emergency (i.e.  First Responder Operations Level)
  • Basic control, containment and/or confinement operations within the capabilities of the resources available
  • Relevant standard operating procedures and termination procedures
  • Principles of the Incident Command System

Training and exercise administrative requirements may be dictated by company policy, site operations, hazardous material response needs, or governmental agencies. In addition to yearly response plan reviews and scheduled updates; training documentation modifications may be required:

  • After each training drill or exercise
  • After each emergency
  • When personnel or response tasks change
  • When the layout or design of the facility changes
  • When policies or procedures change

Continual administrative duties associated with personnel training documentation may be timely or inadequately performed, jeopardizing regulatory compliance or the sustainability of an optimal emergency management program. Maximizing efficiency through advancements in technology can minimize administrative maintenance time. An enterprise-wide training and exercise management system can:

  • Improve regulatory compliance by comparing actual training dates to required training frequencies
  • Reduces costs by incorporating all training and exercise records and documentation into an existing database already being utilized for your emergency planning system.
  • Provide reporting tools to identify personnel requiring training, generate lists of completed training per person, and  document all training completed.
  • Automatically generate training agenda and certificates  for each scheduled training session
  • Simplify communication to attendees by generating emails regarding training requirement reminders, class agendas,
  • Initiate scheduled training requirement reminders to each facility. A comprehensive system will allow for developing a customized email message that will be automatically sent to a list of personnel for a selected time period (example monthly).

Technology has bolstered the availability and popularity of online training. However, depending on the certification, trainees often must complete corresponding classroom training offered by a local government agency such as the emergency management agency, fire or police department. But regardless of the training format, employers must document certifications and verify site-specific response comprehension.

Companies should require annual site-specific training, and routinely implement unannounced emergency drills and scheduled response exercises. Annual refresher training should cover current industry and in-house emergency operating experience; changes in emergency operations plans, policies, procedures, and equipment; as well as, familiarize employees and responders with response procedures, equipment, and systems. Annual training events can be used as a trigger for discussions and feedback on the company’s emergency management program, drills, and exercises. These discussions often cultivate an environment of safety and preparedness, identify mitigation opportunities, and possibly, training deficiencies.

TRP Corp Emergency Response Planning Exercises

Tags: Training and Exercises, Regulatory Compliance, Emergency Management Program, Workplace Safety, OSHA HAZWOPER standard training, HSE Program